How did your training begin?

My journey to parkour began when I saw some chase scenes in some action films. I didn’t know there was a word for it at the time – I just thought that those cool moves were what people naturally did whenever they had to run away from something really fast. I had no idea that they were practiced. Being a rather reckless teenager, I decided to try things out: just jump off of something tall and see if anything cool happens, or run at a fence and see if my body magically carries me over it. Needless to say, I got injured a lot, and I didn’t learn much parkour.

Then one day, after watching District B13, a friend introduced me to the word ‘parkour’. It was magic – the first time I realized that a chase sequence consisted of individual moves that can be broken down and practiced individually and progressed upon. Of course, that night, we all went on some roofs and tried to recreate what we saw. He tried to teach me a ‘get up on a waist height ledge using your arms AND legs’ move, otherwise known as a ‘kong up’. I must have tried it for hours just that night, and came back to try it again and again. I never got it.

For a solid couple of years, I tried ‘parkour’ mostly alone, or alongside people who also had no experience past watching some movies. I got ok at things I perceived to be controlled or had no risk [i.e. balance and climbing], but quickly gave up on things that got me hurt. Any attempt at creating a regular training group was sabotaged by the fact that none of us knew what to do.

The next step was when I moved to the Bay Area and attended a free beginners parkour session. Although I left the class feeling that I had not learned any actual skills [you can’t expect to really learn something in just 1.5 hrs], something amazing happened. For the first time in my life, I met a dedicated group of traceurs who knew what they were doing and an entire community who were passionate about both teaching and learning. At the conclusion of the event, there was an announcement about which groups to contact for training around different neighborhoods.

I lived in Berkeley at the time and it turns out people were training a couple times a week just a few blocks away. I went to check it out, but people were doing ridiculous things. I wanted nothing more than to train with them, but there were no beginners there, and I decided that the people I was watching had better things to do than helping me out.

Later, a friend of a friend who remembered me from the beginners session contacted me and asked if I wanted to climb around at some playground. I thought ‘climb’ and ‘playground’ both sounded not intimidating, so I went. He introduced me to a game called ‘add on’ and then kept on cursing me for doing things that require flexibility. Any feelings of intimidation went away. Then he introduced me to the SF Wednesdays parkour group, which had a much larger percentage of newbies. The more experienced people there seemed to like giving newbies advice, so I felt comfortable. I trained with them consistently and started improving much more rapidly than before.

Eventually started feeling more comfortable in the larger parkour community as well.