How did your training begin?

Initially, I had seen the prototypical videos of kids jumping off of buildings and doing crazy awesome flips and was always too scared to try them myself. I believe one day I actually ran outside at 2:00 AM after watching hours of videos of wall flips and had located the closest tree at full speed, ran up a step or two, and proceeded to fall directly onto my shoulder blades—pinecones, sticks, rocks, and all.

After a few more similar events in my teenage life, I had found a group (Lehigh Valley Parkour) taught by Adam McClellan, Andy Keller, and a few others. Soon after two or three courses, I had realized that all of the videos that I used to think were so awesome were a bit misleading. I had learned much less about doing awesome flips and more about self-discipline, perseverance, and overcoming physical and mental fear. I think at that point my training really “began.”

How has your practice affected your life?

Moreso now than when I was actively training, a few of the ethos of parkour have really shaped my life. Specifically, the ideas of “leaving a place better than how you left it” and “saying I can’t really just mean it’s not a priority for me right now” have really become the go-to sayings in my life. Those two sayings alone have driven me to pursue higher education, do awesome projects in the tech world, and all-around be a better person.

Years later, those two sayings have stuck for me.

Also, I think that the overall openness and friendliness of the parkour community is still something that I seek out in whatever kind of job or organization I am working in.